FlynnsPawsMe

Pause. Repent. Reflect.

Prayer is the act of addressing a god or spirit for the purpose of worship or petition.[1] Specific forms of this may include praise, requesting guidance or assistance, confessing sins, as an act of reparation or an expression of one’s thoughts and emotions. The words used in prayer may take the form of intercession, a hymn, incantation, words of gratitude, or a spontaneous utterance in the person’s praying words. Praying can be done in public, as a group, or in private.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prayer

Prayer of Saint Francis

The hymn version of Make Me A Channel of Your Peace is an anthem of the Royal British Legion and is usually sung every year at the Service of Remembrance in November at the Royal Albert Hall, London. It goes as follows:

Make me a channel of your peace, Where there is hatred let me bring your love, Where there is injury your pardon Lord, And where there’s doubt true faith in you. Make me a channel of your peace, Where there’s despair in life, let me bring hope, Where there is darkness, only light, And where there’s sadness, ever joy. O Master grant that I may never seek, So much to be consoled as to console, To be understood as to understand, To be loved as to love with all my soul. Make me a channel of your peace, It is in pardoning that we are pardoned, In giving to all men that we receive And in dying that we are born to eternal life.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prayer_of_Saint_Francis

The Prayer of Saint Francis is a Christian prayer. It is attributed to the 13th-century saint Francis of Assisi, although the prayer in its present form cannot be traced back further than 1912, when it was printed in France in French, in a small spiritual magazine called La Clochette (The Little Bell) as an anonymous prayer, as demonstrated by Dr Christian Renoux in 2001. The prayer has been known in the United States since 1936 and Cardinal Francis Spellman and Senator Hawkes distributed millions of copies of the prayer during and just after World War II.[1]

The Serenity Prayer

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; the courage to change the things I can; and the wisdom to know the difference. Living one day at a time; enjoying one moment at a time; accepting hardships as the pathway to peace. Taking, as he did, this sinful world as it is, not as I would have it. Trusting that he will make all things right if I surrender to his will; that I may be reasonably happy in this life; and supremely happy with him forever in the next.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serenity_Prayer

The Serenity Prayer is the common name for an originally untitled prayer, most commonly attributed to the theologian Reinhold Niebuhr.[1] The prayer has been adopted by Alcoholics Anonymous and other twelve-step programs. In 2008, Yale Book of Quotations editor Fred R. Shapiro published evidence that a version of the prayer existed by 1936. Shapiro believes that this casts doubt on Niebuhr’s authorship of the prayer.[2]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serenity_Prayer

A Psalm of David

The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want. He makes me lie down in green pastures; he leads me beside still waters; he restores my soul. He leads me in right paths for his name’s sake. Even though I walk through the darkest valley, I fear no evil; for you are with me; your rod and your staff— they comfort me. You prepare a table before me in the presence of my enemies; you anoint my head with oil; my cup overflows. Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life, and I shall dwell in the house of the Lord my whole life long.

In the 23rd Psalm (Greek numbering: Psalm 22) in the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, the writer describes God as protector and provider. The text, beloved by Jews and Christians alike, has often been set to music.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psalm_23

The Lord’s Prayer

1928 Book of Common Prayer (BCP) Version

Our Father, who art in heaven, Hallowed be thy Name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, On earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, As we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, But deliver us from evil. [For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever and ever.] Amen.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Book_of_Common_Prayer

The Lord’s Prayer, also known as the Our Father or Pater noster, is perhaps the best-known prayer in Christianity. On Easter Sunday 2007 it was estimated that 2 billion Catholic, Protestant and Eastern Orthodox Christians read, recited, or sang the short prayer in hundreds of languages.[1] Although many theological differences and various modes and manners of worship divide Christians, according to Fuller Seminary professor Clayton Schmit “there is a sense of solidarity in knowing that Christians around the globe are praying together…, and these words always unite us.”[1]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lord%27s_Prayer

Latin version[2]

Pater noster, qui es in caelis: sanctificetur Nomen Tuum; adveniat Regnum Tuum; fiat voluntas Tua, sicut in caelo, et in terra. Panem nostrum cotidianum da nobis hodie; et dimitte nobis debita nostra, Sicut et nos dimittimus debitoribus nostris; et ne nos inducas in tentationem; sed libera nos a Malo.[3]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lord%27s_Prayer#cite_note-1

Original text in Greek

Πάτερ ἡμῶν ὁ ἐν τοῖς οὐρανοῖς· ἁγιασθήτω τὸ ὄνομά σου· ἐλθέτω ἡ βασιλεία σου· γενηθήτω τὸ θέλημά σου, ὡς ἐν οὐρανῷ καὶ ἐπὶ τῆς γῆς· τὸν ἄρτον ἡμῶν τὸν ἐπιούσιον δὸς ἡμῖν σήμερον· καὶ ἄφες ἡμῖν τὰ ὀφειλήματα ἡμῶν, ὡς καὶ ἡμεῖς ἀφίεμεν τοῖς ὀφειλέταις ἡμῶν· καὶ μὴ εἰσενέγκῃς ἡμᾶς εἰς πειρασμόν, ἀλλὰ ῥῦσαι ἡμᾶς ἀπὸ τοῦ πονηροῦ. [Ὅτι σοῦ ἐστιν ἡ βασιλεία καὶ ἡ δύναμις καὶ ἡ δόξα εἰς τοὺς αἰῶνας. ἀμήν.]

Guardian Angel Prayer

This is the traditional Catholic prayer to one’s guardian angel.[4]

Angel of God, my guardian dear to whom God’s love commits me here. Ever this day/night be at my side to light, to guard, to rule and guide. Amen.

In Latin:

Angele Dei, qui custos es mei, me, tibi commissum pietate superna, illumina, custodi, rege et guberna.

A guardian angel is an angel assigned to protect and guide a particular person. The concept of tutelary angels and their hierarchy was extensively developed in Christianity in the 5th century by Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guardian_angel_%28spirit%29#Guardian_Angel_prayer

Bahá’í Prayer

Short Obligatory Prayer – To be recited once in twenty four hours, at noon.

I bear witness, O my God, that Thou hast created me to know Thee and to worship Thee. I testify, at this moment, to my powerlessness and to Thy might, to my poverty and to Thy wealth. There is none other God but Thee, the Help in Peril, the Self-Subsisting. Bahá’u’lláh

The daily obligatory prayers are three in number….  The believer is entirely free to choose any one of these three prayers, but is under the obligation of reciting one of them, and in accordance with any specific directions with which it may be accompanied.” —from a letter written on behalf of Shoghi Effendi

http://www.bahaiprayers.org/obligshort.htm

“By ‘morning’, ‘noon’, and ‘evening,’ mentioned in connection with the Obligatory Prayers, is meant respectively the intervals between sunrise and noon, between noon and sunset, and from sunset until two hours after sunset.” —Synopsis and Codification of the Kitáb-i-Aqdas, p. 36

Druid’s Prayer

The following version is that usually adopted by Neopagan and Mesopagan groups such as the OBOD and the British Druid Oder (BDO). English Translation

Grant, God, thy refuge; and in refuge, strength; and in strength, understanding; and in understanding, knowledge; and from knowledge, knowledge of what is right; and from knowledge of what is right, the love of it; and from loving, the love of God. God and all goodness.

Original Welsh

Dyro, Dduw, dy nawdd;ac yn nawdd, nerth;ac yn nerth, deall;ac yn neall, gwybod;ac o wybod, gwybod y cyfiawn;ac o wybod y cyfiawn ei garu;ac o garu, caru Duw.Duw a phob daioni.

The Druid’s Prayer (Welsh: Gweddi’r Derwydd) or “Gorsedd Prayer” (Gweddi’r Orsedd) is a prayer composed by Iolo Morganwg which is still a staple in the ritual of both gorseddau and Neo-Druidism. Neo-Druids sometimes substitute the words y Dduwies (“the Goddess”) for the original Duw (“God”).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Druid%27s_Prayer

Gayatri Mantra

In IAST:

oṃ bhūr bhuvaḥ svaḥ tat savitur vareṇyaṃ bhargo devasya dhīmahi dhiyo yo naḥ pracodayāt

The Gayatri Mantra is a highly revered Sanskrit mantra with origins in the Vedas. It is a verse in the vedic Gayatri metre (whence the mantra’s name), consting of 24 syllables, taken from a hymn of the Rigveda (3.62.10). Its recitation is always preceded by oṃ and the formula bhūr bhuvaḥ svaḥ, known as the mahāvyāhṛti (“great mystical phrase”). This prefixing of the mantra proper is prescribed already in the Taittiriya Aranyaka (2.11.1-8), which states that scriptural recitation was always to begin with the chanting of the syllable oṃ, followed by the three Vyahrtis and the Gayatri verse.[1]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gayatri_Mantra

Om mani padme hum

Aaauummm! Avalokiteśvara Mantra In Devanagari:

ॐ मणि पद्मे हूँ,

In IAST:

oṃ maṇi padme hūṃ

Om mani padme hum[1] (Derived from the Sanskrit, Devanagari ॐ मणि पद्मे हूँ, IAST oṃ maṇi padme hūṃ),mani meaning the jewel and Padma-the lotus. The six syllabled mantra of the bodhisattva of compassion, Avalokiteshvara (Tibetan Chenrezig, Chinese Guanyin). The mantra is particularly associated with the four-armed Shadakshari form of Avalokiteshvara.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Om_mani_padme_hum